Create your own USB Rubber Ducky using normal USB

Ever Wonder to make your own Rubber Ducky? I don’t want to be competitive against the Hakshop. First, if you wanted to purchase original USB Rubber Ducky from them, cause it’s truly made straightforward for faster-executing programs. It would be better and faster for executing or writing the payloads. Yet, If you wanted to make your own particular USB Rubber Ducky? Windows (Operating System) USB 3.0 Flash Drive Best Rubber Ducky USB Payloads! Supported Flash Drives: Patriot 8GB Supersonic Xpress* ( Almost all now are 2307 on Amazon [bought 9 from all 9 sellers] ) Kingston DataTraveler 3.0 T111 8GB Silicon power marvel M60 64GB Patriot Stellar 64 Gb Phison Toshiba TransMemory-MX USB 3.0 16GB (May ship with 2307) Toshiba TransMemory-MX USB 3.0 8GB (May ship with 2307) Kingston DataTraveler G4 64 GB Patriot PSF16GXPUSB Supersonic Xpress 16GB Silicon Power 32GB Blaze B30 (SP032GBUF3B30V1K) Kingston Digital 8GB USB 3.0 DataTraveler (DT100G3/8GB)* – Using PS2251-03 (By the way, the DriveCom.exe does not work for it, you need use Phison MPALL Tools to burn the firmware.) Verbatim STORE N GO 32GB USB 3.0 Verbatim STORE N GO V3 8GB USB 3.0 (May ship with 2307) Make Your Own USB Rubber Ducky Determining the Microcontroller of Our USB Flash Drive: Before beginning, we need to ensure our USB utilizes the supported controller. We can utilize a program called Flash Drive Information Extractor to assemble the required data about our USB. Simply open the tool and hit the “Get USB Flash Drive Information” catch while you have your USB embedded into your PC. On the off chance that your drive utilizes the Phison 2303 (2251-03) controller, the yield ought to appear to be like this: In any case, if your USB gadget has an alternate one, it is no doubt that you can’t reinvent it to a HID gadget with this adventure. Make a point to check the known bolstered gadgets so as to get one that will work. Keeping in mind the end goal to change our upheld USB drive, we have to manufacture the apparatuses which interface with it. The source code is distributed on GitHub by Manny Cuevas. Really, Visual Studio accompanies a flawless component that gives us a chance to clone the entire archive. You can even connect with VS from the GitHub site: After cloning and opening the repostitory. You are most likely to see three solutions. DriveCom EmbedPayload Injector We will need DriveCom and EmbedPayload only. If opened, you can compile with Ctrl + Shift + B or Menu bar – Build – Build Solution. If you cannot clone the repository through Visual Studio, download the .zip file from GitHub and open the .sln files in each folder of the solutions. DriveCom and EmbedPayload should be in the …\Psychson\tools directory now: E:\Documents\Bad_USB\Psychson\tools. Burner Image A “burner image” is required for dumping and flashing firmware on your drive. These are typically named using the convention “BNxxVyyyz.BIN”. Burner images for Phison controllers can be found here. Even though the site is only available in Russian, you will find the download link if you scan the site for “BN03.” BN implies burner image, and 03 corresponds to PS2251-03. I extracted the files in E:\Documents\BadUSB\Burner_Image\. Every burner image should do the job, but you can use the newest version which is indicated by the “Vyyy” part of the name. Download Duck Encoder The “Duck Encoder” is a Java-based cross-platform tool which converts scripts into HID payloads. It is based upon the Bad-USB called “Rubber Ducky” by Hak5. You can download it here. (Do not forget to install Java.) I saved it at E:\Documents\Bad_USB\DuckEncoder\. Creating Custom Firmware At this point, all our preparations are done and we can continue using the tools. In this step, we simply have to go to our …\Psychson\firmware\ directory and run build.bat. If everything goes right, you will see a new folder with many different files inside. The fw.bin file is the file we will use in the following payload. Writing a Script You may ask yourself in which language we are going to write our script. Since the Duck Encoder is based upon “Rubber Ducky,” we will use “Duckyscript” as the language. The syntax is rather easy. More detailed instructions can be found here. We will go ahead and create a .txt file in our preferred directory (E:\Documents\Bad_USB\DuckEncoder\script.txt). I thought of showing you something more interesting than a “Hello World” script, so I made this one: As you may suppose, the Bad USB will “press” Windows + R and cause windows to shut down immediately with this script. In addition, you can clearly see that I wrote “/” instead of “-“. That’s because our “keyboard” (Bad USB) has a U.S. layout and Windows is set to DEU in my country. Keep in mind that we have to change the Windows layout to U.S. and write the script the way we would do usually, or the way your victim’s PC would write it. Don’t be confused of the input. You can even use custom scripts and do some reverse engineering here. Converting It into an HID Payload It is time to start using the Windows terminal – cmd. java -jar “PATH to \duckencode.jar” -i “PATH to \script.txt”-o “\payload.bin Path” Example: java -jar E:\Documents\BadUSB\DuckEncoder\duckencode.jar -i E:\Documents\Bad_USB\DuckEncoder\script.txt -o E:\Documents\Bad_USB\DuckEncoder\inject.bin We won’t get any output, but inject.bin should be created in E:\Documents\Bad_USB\DuckEncoder\, in my instance. Embed the Payload in the Firmware Now we need to use the tools we built with Visual Studio. Obviously, EmbedPayload is to embed payloads. We simply have to execute it in cmd: “Path to EmbedPayload.exe” “PATH to payload” “PATH to the firmware we built” Read more…

 

Rubber Ducky Payloads

The programming language, dubbed DuckyScript, is a simple instruction-based interface to creating a customized payload. However, it runs independently from the microcontroller that installs the drivers to the machine. On some older models running Windows XP, the device took upwards of 60 seconds to install the drivers. On newer machines running Windows 7, it took anywhere from 10-30. And if the drivers take longer to install than the delay you put at the beginning of your payload, it will begin firing off anyways. There is a firmware release you can flash onto your Ducky that will additionally act as a USB flash drive where executable binaries can be hosted. In this case, it would be significantly faster to open the drive and load the file into memory. The benefits to this include the ability to potentially avoid dropping any files to the machine quicker than remotely retrieving a payload no internet connectivity required for additional payload but remotely retrieving a payload is a viable method if you absolutely have to do it that way. In short, it is a very promising and effective tool, but seriously lacks versatility. In some machines it may take 5 seconds to load the drivers, in others maybe longer than 60. Then you have to account for how long it will take to deliver your payload in accordance to how fast the machine can handle keystrokes. This becomes a huge bummer during official penetration testing scenarios where you are required to enter the office physically, because the variety of machine setups can be drastically different. Otherwise, exactly what it says on the tin: emulates a keyboard and mouse set up to deliver instructions. How to Make Your Own USB Rubber Ducky Using a Normal USB? Payload – Hello World Payload – WiFi password grabber Payload – Basic Terminal Commands Ubuntu Payload – Information Gathering Ubuntu Payload – Hide CMD Window Payload – Netcat-FTP-download-and-reverse-shell Payload – Wallpaper Prank Payload – YOU GOT QUACKED! Payload – Reverse Shell Payload – Fork Bomb Payload – Utilman Exploit Payload – WiFi Backdoor Payload – Non-Malicious Auto Defacer Payload – Lock Your Computer Message Payload – Ducky Downloader Payload – Ducky Phisher Payload – FTP Download / Upload Payload – Restart Prank Payload – Silly Mouse, Windows is for Kids Payload – Windows Screen rotation hack Payload – Powershell Wget + Execute Payload – mimikatz payload Payload – MobileTabs Payload – Create Wireless Network Association (AUTO CONNECT) PINEAPPLE Payload – Retrieve SAM and SYSTEM from a live file system Payload – Ugly Rolled Prank Payload – XMAS Payload – Pineapple Assocation (VERY FAST) Payload – WiFun v1.1 Payload – MissDirection Payload – Remotely Possible Payload – Batch Wiper/Drive Eraser Payload – Generic Batch Payload – Paint Hack Payload – Local DNS Poisoning Payload – Deny Net Access Payload – RunEXE from SD Payload – Run Java from SD Payload – OSX Root Backdoor Payload – OSX User Backdoor Payload – OSX Local DNS Poisoning Payload – OSX Youtube Blaster Payload – OSX Photo Booth Prank Payload – OSX Internet Protocol Slurp Payload – OSX Ascii Prank Payload – OSX iMessage Capture Payload – OSX Grab Minecraft Account Password and upload to FTP Read more…

 

What is USB Rubber Ducky?

“If it quacks like a keyboard and types like a keyboard, it must be a keyboard.” “Humans use keyboards. Computers trust humans.” The USB Rubber Ducky is a keystroke injection tool disguised as a generic flash drive. Computers recognize it as a regular keyboard and accept pre-programmed keystroke payloads at over 1000 words per minute. Payloads are crafted using a simple scripting language and can be used to drop reverse shells, inject binaries, brute force pin codes, and many other automated functions for the penetration tester and systems administrator. Since 2010 the USB Rubber Ducky has been a favorite among hackers, penetration testers and IT professionals. With origins as the first IT automation HID using an embedded dev-board, it has since grown into a full fledged commercial Keystroke Injection Attack Platform. The USB Rubber Ducky captured the imagination of hackers with its simple scripting language, formidable hardware, and covert design. Quack like a Keyboard! Nearly every computer including desktops, laptops, tablets and smartphones take input from Humans via Keyboards. It’s why there’s a specification with the ubiquitous USB standard known as HID – or Human Interface Device. Simply put, any USB device claiming to be a Keyboard HID will be automatically detected and accepted by most modern operating systems. Whether it be a Windows, Mac, Linux or Android device the Keyboard is King. By taking advantage of this inherent trust with scripted keystrokes at speeds beyond 1000 words per minute traditional countermeasures can be bypassed by this tireless trooper – the USB Rubber Ducky. Ducky Script. Super Simple. The USB Rubber Ducky’s scripting language is focused on ease-of use. Writing payloads is as simple as writing a text file in notepad, textedit, vi or emacs. Type “Hello World” with STRING Hello World Add pauses between commands with DELAY. Use DELAY 100for short 100 milliseconds pauses or DELAY 1000 for longer 1 second pauses. Combine specials keys. ALT F4, CONTROL ESCAPE, WINDOWS R, SHIFT TAB. They all do exactly as expected. Use REMto comment your code before sharing it. That’s it! You just learned Ducky Script! Unmatched Performance, Simplicity and Value. We learned from the experiences of hundreds of hackers worldwide working on the original prototype dev-board. Based on their feedback we developed a truly remarkable custom hardware platform with an order of magnitude more processing power and versatility. Fast 60 MHz 32-bit Processor Convenient Type A USB Connector Expandable Memory via Micro SD Hideable inside an in an innocuous looking case Onboard Payload Replay Button Cross Platform Windows, Mac, Linux, Android – they all love keyboards. Convenience is king, so when it comes to plugging in a new input device the default is to accept and obey. Keyboards represent human input afterall. Before USB there were various standards, be it PS/2, AT, Apple Desktop Bus and various other DINs. Now that everything is Universal the Human Input Device is “Plug and Play”. Community Payload Generators, Firmware, Encoders and Toolkits The USB Rubber Ducky project has fostered considerable innovation and creativity among the community. Some gems include Customize pre-assembled attacks from our repository – Payload Wiki  Duck Toolkitto generate payloads for Reconnaissance, Exploitation and Reporting and Online inject.bin encoding. The Simple Ducky Payload Generatorfor Linux with Password Cracker, Meterpreter and Netcat integration. VID & PID Swapperto cloak your device Ducky-Decode Firmware and Encoder adding Mass Storage, Multiple Payloads, Multilingual and and much more. And of course the USB Rubber Ducky Forumsfor Payload sharing, suggestions, questions and information.

 

Hash Cracker Written in Python

Crack hashes within 20 seconds A good example of cracking tool written in python, which you can create in less than 15 minutes. Python is really useful for creating security tools. You can create many tools like Port Scanners, Hash Crackers, Servers and Clients and many more. A good book I recommend reading that focuses Read more…

 

Whopper Web Shell

This blog post will be introducing the Whopper, and not the juicy beef burger from Burger King, the simple web shell one liner. Uploading web shells to a web application is a lot of fun; nothing is more gratifying than trying to figure out how to abuse a feature and finally landing a shell. The Read more…

 

Finding a subdomain takeover using knockpy

What is subdomain takeover? A service named ‘assets’ on your website which located at assets.example-site.com hosted at third party like bitbucket or heroku at this url myasset-expample.bitbucket.com , and this service is not used on bitbucket , you just decided to use it and it expired or you did not claim it before but you Read more…

 

Online URL Fuzzing tool

URL Fuzz testing or URL Fuzzing is a  technique, which basically consists in finding implementation bugs using malformed/semi-malformed data injection in an automated fashion. Also URL Fuzzing is a technique to find hidden files and directories on a web server, discover activities which allows you to discover resources that were not meant to be publicly accessible. For example the Read more…

 

Blog Post Title

What goes into a blog post? Helpful, industry-specific content that: 1) gives readers a useful takeaway, and 2) shows you’re an industry expert. Use your company’s blog posts to opine on current industry topics, humanize your company, and show how your products and services can help people.